World Cup 2011: Most impactful bowling performances

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02 Apr 2020 | 10:53 AM
authorCricket.com Staff

World Cup 2011: Most impactful bowling performances

We look at five best and impactful bowling performances, in no specific order, from the 2011 World Cup.

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It was on this very day in 2011 when MS Dhoni smoked Nuwan Kulasekara for that historic six over long-on to end India's 28-year wait for the World Cup. The Indian captain was named player of the match in the final against Sri Lanka for his knock and just like his, there were quite a few exceptional batting performances that lit up the showpiece event.

However, as the saying goes, 'batsmen win you games, bowlers win you tournaments'. Especially in a big tournament like the World Cup, it's generally the bowlers who help you win big games. In the 2011 edition, there were bowlers who stood head and shoulders above the rest and came up with match-winning contributions. Here, we look at five best and impactful bowling performances, in no specific order, from the 2011 World Cup.

Stuart Broad (4/15) v South Africa, Chennai

South Africa would have fancied their chances after Imran Tahir and Co. bundled England out for mere 171 in the first innings, but Stuart Broad probably had other ideas. The right-arm paceman was introduced in the attack in the 16th over and by then South Africa had already reached 68/1. They just needed 104 runs and had nine wickets to spare, plus Hashim Amla and Jacques Kallis were going about their business very smartly. England were in desperate need of wickets and that's when Broad put his hand up and did the job for his team. He first knocked over Amla and then had Kallis caught behind in his very next over. This was the opening England were looking for and James Anderson pounced on it by picking up two wickets in no time. Despite wickets falling in a heap, South Africa managed to crawl to 164/8 and needed just eight runs from the last three overs. Dale Steyn was unbeaten on 20 and Broad was brought back for his third spell. He got Steyn and Morne Morkel out in the space of four deliveries and helped England pull off a miraculous six-run victory.

Dale Steyn (5/50) v India, Nagpur

After a disappointing loss against England, South Africa needed a strong comeback to get their campaign back on track. They were up against India who were unbeaten and were the red-hot favourites to win the title. The home team were 267/1 and still had just more than 10 overs to spare. The 350-run mark looked inevitable and Sachin Tendulkar and Gautam Gambhir had already added 125 runs by then. Steyn's partner Morkel dismissed Tendulkar for 111 and that's when the ace paceman took over. India promoted Yusuf Pathan to No. 4 but Steyn accounted for Gambhir and Pathan in the space of three deliveries to bring South Africa back in the game. Yuvraj Singh, Dhoni and Virat Kohli didn't contribute much and then Steyn returned for his final spell and cleaned up the tail in no time. India lost their last nine wickets for just 29 runs and were bowled out for 296. In reply, Amla, Kallis and AB de Villiers scored fifties but it was Robin Peterson's heroics in the final over that gave them a morale-boosting victory.

Shahid Afridi (4/30) v West Indies, Dhaka

After topping their group, Pakistan were high on confidence ahead of their quarter-final clash against West Indies. The Caribbean side had quite a few power-hitters in their squad apart from a couple of smart operators. Asked to bat, West Indies lost three wickets inside six overs but experienced campaigners Ramnaresh Sarwan and Shivnarine Chanderpaul weathered the storm. They added 42 runs for the fourth wicket and just when it looked like they would pull their team out of the bog, Shahid Afridi sent Sarwan back. He dismantled West Indies' middle-order by dismissing Kieron Pollard and Devon Thomas in consecutive deliveries and then returned at the end to close the innings by knocking over Ravi Rampaul. Chasing 113, Pakistan's openers Mohammad Hafeez and Kamran Akmal got the required runs without any fuss.

Jacob Oram (4/49) v South Africa, Dhaka

In their quarter-final encounter against New Zealand, South African bowlers bowled their heart out before their batsmen surrendered to Jacob Oram and Nathan McCullum, losing their fifth knockout encounter since they participated in the tournament for the first time in 1992. The likes of Steyn, Morkel and Imran Tahir bowled with solid discipline and restricted the Black Caps to a below-par total of 221/8. South Africa then got off to the worst possible start with Amla getting out in a bizarre fashion in the very first over. Despite losing an early wicket, South Africa were 69/1 at one stage and that's when the collapse happened. New Zealand bowling allrounder got the all-important wicket of South African captain Graeme Smith. He only gave away 19 runs in his first six overs before being taken out of the attack. South Africa kept losing wickets and Oram was brought back into the attack after a few overs. He wiped out the Proteas's dangerous lower middle-order - Faf du Plessis, Johan Botha and Peterson - and ensured there was no comeback of sorts. South Africa were dismissed for 172, while New Zealand made it through to the semi-finals.  

Wahab Riaz (5/46) v India, Mohali

Pakistan might have lost the semi-final against their arch-rivals India but Wahab Riaz held his own by picking up a five-wicket haul. Wahab bowled with pace and very good control, troubling almost every Indian batsman. It was Wahab who pinned Virender Sehwag right in front of the stumps after the opener got India off to a rapid start. He then broke the back of India's batting order by dismantling their middle-order. He knocked over the in-form Yuvraj Singh with a superb inswinging yorker and also got rid of Kohli and Dhoni. The left-arm paceman completed his five-wicket haul by having Zaheer Khan caught behind. Pakistan restricted India to 260 but failed to chase down the total. 

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Stuart Christopher John BroadDale Willem SteynSahibzada Mohammad Shahid Khan AfridiWahab RiazJacob David Philip OramICC Cricket World Cup

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